The multi-billion dollar “market” for so-called “carbon credits” could be in jeopardy as the 1997 Kyoto Protocol, which created the framework for the emissions-limiting scheme, expires in 2012 — with no apparent successor agreement in sight.

Several weeks ago, one of the central figures associated with the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change — Ottmar Edenhofer — admitted what critics of the IPCC’s approach to addressing purported climate change have suspected for some time now: Economic redistribution, not science, is driving the agenda. As reported for The New American on November 19, Edenhofer told Germany’s NZZ Online Sunday:

The United Nations and its corporate allies called for a global ban on incandescent light bulbs and kerosene lamps Wednesday at the COP16 global-warming summit in Cancun, claiming in a new study that “energy-efficient” lights would reduce the amount of carbon dioxide emissions.

Amid low expectations and widespread disillusion, thousands of “climate dignitaries” from around the world descended on the Mexican resort city of Cancun for the first day of global-warming negotiations, each hoping to get something. A massive security presence — over 3,000 extra police and soldiers, along with warships off the coast — was deployed to protect the event and its participants.

For those who have tracked the development of the theory of manmade climate change in recent years, it seems as if its adherents thrive on a succession of purported crises. It is as if every study which is debunked, every scandal which discredits the prophets of doom, and every economic failure associated with the climate change theory has sparked two more crises to take their place.