Lisa JacksonThe U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has officially declared that carbon dioxide and other so-called greenhouse gases are dangerous to public health and welfare, paving the way for much stricter emissions standards.

Kevin RuddAustralian delegates to the UN climate-change conference have arrived empty-handed in Copenhagen since last week their parliament defeated cap-and trade legislation. The surprising turn of events was brought about by a groundswell of angry constituents enraged at the proposed massive tax hike.

green costsItem: The Obama administration must make a commitment on carbon-emission reductions, insisted the Washington Post on November 19. The House of Representatives, commented the Post, “has endorsed a 17 percent reduction in carbon emissions from the 2005 level, and the Senate is considering a 20 percent cut. The administration is also moving forward with Environmental Protection Agency regulation that does not require congressional approval. Mr. Obama should be able to produce a number or a range of numbers that reflects the level of emissions reduction the United States can achieve.”

For years, former Vice President Al Gore has foisted his environmental jeremiads on the world, traveling by private jet to calling upon the industrialized world to repent of its polluting ways. Now, as the nations of the world gather in Copenhagen to discuss addressing the climate change which Gore had proclaimed was threatening the Earth with near-certain doom, the man who only weeks ago was appealing to the “collective will” of mankind may be absenting himself from the proceedings.

The veracity of proponents of the theory of man-made climate change is very much in doubt in the days leading up to the UN conference in Copenhagen. However, one thing that will be proven beyond a doubt in the next several weeks is that not all pollution is created equal: Some pollution is apparently sanctified by the context of its generation.