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The growing energy boom in the United States could make it the largest global oil producer by the end of the decade, temporarily exceeding Saudi Arabia, and a top exporter of natural gas, according to a new report. Released Monday, the International Energy Agency (IEA), a French research group for oil-importing nations, published data showing that by 2030, the United States will be energy self-sufficient on net and North America will become a net oil exporter.

Is the work of the American oil industry the moral equivalent of South African apartheid? Will coffee beans cease to exist before the end of this century? The most recent shrill outbursts from the environmental left offer the latest evidence for global warming; the silly season for news is extended later and later into the fall.

The dizzying speed of the growth of the surveillance state and the increasing sophistication of the tools used to build it are paid for in large measure by funds doled out by the Army’s Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA).

At The New American we have chronicled the various projects sponsored by the über-secret research and development arm of the military. One of the newest technologies being pursued by DARPA will not only widen the field of vision of government’s never-blinking eye, but it purports to predict the behavior of those being watched.

Controversial "hockey stick" climate-change scientist Michael Mann is suing global-warming skeptics for defamation by comparing him to Jerry Sandusky, while earning their ridicule with false claims of having received the Nobel Peace Prize.

Seems that our coverage of the ever-widening and increasingly sophisticated web of surveillance being spun by state and federal agencies is only scratching the surface — literally.

Recently stories have been published regarding a subtler weapon being developed and deployed by private citizens determined to defend themselves from the government and its widening war against our constitutionally protected civil liberties: small wearable computers.

 

 

 

 

 

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