Does the Fourth Amendment’s requirement that the government obtain a warrant to search one’s effects based on probable cause apply to e-mail communications? It all depends on where those e-mails are being stored.

An American company is planning to build the largest rockets since the days of NASA’s Apollo program, and promises to deliver payloads to orbit for a tenth the cost of the space shuttles of the U.S.’s troubled space agency. SpaceX has already successfully launch a smaller vehicle called the Falcon 9 on several occasions, but now the company has announced plans for a bold, new step in the development of private space flight.

As the United Nations officially began its first major climate-change conference of the year in Bangkok, Thailand, on April 5, UN climate chief Christiana Figueres warned of dire consequences if governments refuse to back ever-greater cuts in carbon-dioxide emissions with a new global-warming treaty.

An article by James Delingpole for The Telegraph reveals that the ideology of John Holdren, President Obama’s "science czar," is even more extreme than many Americans may have realized before now.

Americans have become accustomed to the presence of Global Positioning System (or GPS) technology embedded in everything from the GPS on their dash to their cell phones and iPads. In fact, GPS is nearly taken for granted for everything from locating a restaurant to navigating a fishing boat through the fog. But now it appears that GPS, which was developed primarily for its military applications, is rather overtly returning to its "national security" roots, as NASA plans to turn the security of the GPS system over to the Department of Homeland Security.