Ironworkers Local 7 in New England has a complaint against the acolytes of “green energy.” Though there is a 16-turbine wind-power project planned in Sheffield, Vermont, and a 33-turbine undertaking in Dummer, New Hampshire, no locals will do the work: Ironworkers will be brought in from out of state.

In 2007, President George W. Bush signed into law an amendment, intended as a means to save energy and limit pollution, that will ban the incandescent light bulb effective January 1, 2014. Republican lawmakers have been tirelessly working to repeal the ban before it takes effect. In the meantime, however, companies are moving forward as if the ban is permanent. Two makers of lighting products have already produced LED bulbs that are said to be bright enough to replace the 100-watt incandescent bulbs, but there is a catch: the replacement bulbs are approximately $50 each. The new light technology will be on display at the LightFair trade show in Philadelphia this week.

As the Space Shuttle Endeavour began its final mission on May 16, the future of NASA’s human space program remains uncertain. The space shuttle program is steadily approaching its end, but the readiness of the space agency to move forward in a post-shuttle era remains to be seen.

Dr. Aevar Petersen, chair of Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna (CAFF), recently told the Foreign Ministers of Arctic countries that the tree line in that region may grow 300 miles further north by 2100. “Changes seem to be happening even more rapidly than we had anticipated just ten years ago.… The tree line is moving north quite rapidly.”

On Thursday, May 12, the United States House of Representatives voted 243 to 179 to lift the offshore oil drilling moratorium. The bill could allow further oil and gas exploration in American oceans.

Entitled the “Reversing President Obama’s Offshore Moratorium Act,” the House-passed legislation demands that the Interior Department set a production goal of three million barrels of oil per day for it 2012-2017 leasing plan.