Shale Gas“The oil and natural gas we rely on for 75 percent of our energy are running out,” warned the President in a televised speech on energy policy. And because we are running out, “we must prepare quickly” for a transition “to strict conservation and to the use of coal and permanent renewable energy sources, like solar power.”

The law of unintended leftist consequences has come home to roost again, this time in the form of dead birds. The Los Angeles Times reported early this week that wind turbines are killing the raptor population in California's Altamont Pass, where thousands of the unsightly machines mangle and mutilate 24 hours a day 365 days a year.

The Australian federal government’s effort to levy a tax on carbon-dioxide emissions to battle supposed “climate change” is facing massive resistance from voters, despite a flurry of pro-carbon-tax propaganda and government-funded reports touting alleged benefits of the scheme while downplaying its harmful effects.

The crisis at Japan’s Fukushima nuclear plant in the aftermath of the magnitude 9 earthquake on March 11 has had aftershocks of its own around the globe. Predictably, whenever there is an incident involving a nuclear power plant, politicians will scramble to call for new safety measures, new inspections, and call into question the entire role of nuclear power in meeting the energy needs of a burgeoning global population. Such posturing will undoubtedly delay efforts to meet power consumption needs throughout the developed world, but for the Germans, the fallout from Fukushima will now include the nation’s abandonment of nuclear power altogether.

A research arm of the World Health Organization has resurrected the specter of the association of cancer with cellphones, classifying the use of the mobile devices as possibly carcinogenic, much as it has categorized alcohol, coffee, pesticides, engine exhaust, and even working the graveyard shift. The announcement was made on May 31 by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) after a panel of scientists from 31 countries reviewed dozens of studies on the issue.