Sci/Tech

The multi-billion dollar “market” for so-called “carbon credits” could be in jeopardy as the 1997 Kyoto Protocol, which created the framework for the emissions-limiting scheme, expires in 2012 — with no apparent successor agreement in sight.

NASA’s anticipated press conference concerning a breakthrough in astrobiology proved once again that life is stranger than scientists had known, but not as strange as some reporters and bloggers might have hoped.

Several weeks ago, one of the central figures associated with the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change — Ottmar Edenhofer — admitted what critics of the IPCC’s approach to addressing purported climate change have suspected for some time now: Economic redistribution, not science, is driving the agenda. As reported for The New American on November 19, Edenhofer told Germany’s NZZ Online Sunday:

The United Nations and its corporate allies called for a global ban on incandescent light bulbs and kerosene lamps Wednesday at the COP16 global-warming summit in Cancun, claiming in a new study that “energy-efficient” lights would reduce the amount of carbon dioxide emissions.

Are online TV alternatives prompting a mass exodus of viewers from cable and satellite television services? That depends on who you’re talking to. With the influx of such Internet-based video offerings as Hulu, Netflix, Google TV, Apple TV, and other Internet Protocol TV (IPTV) services, which allow individuals to watch programs on TVs as well as laptops, iPods, smart phones, and other mobile devices, some industry observers predict that more and more viewers will soon be opting out of traditional TV.

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