An agency of the federal government is having a hard time placing a dollar value on the life of American citizens. Although the debate at the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has probably escaped the attention of most of this nation’s citizens, it has a direct impact on the economic cost of the agency’s regulations — and thus a direct or indirect financial impact on the lives of those Americans the agency claims to be protecting.

Nothing says 21st century technology like … a blimp.

According to a story published by wired.com this fall, the Pentagon plans to deploy a “giant spy blimp” floating 20,000 feet above the ground that will house a supercomputer capable of monitoring the flow of all data and communication for miles around.

As the tortured science which is invoked to support the theory of anthropogenic climate change continues to lose its credibility in the eyes of the American public, it appears that some of the theory’s advocates are weighing the virtues of using blunt force to impose the changes they believe are necessary to "save the world." Consider, for example, Dr. James Hansen (left) of NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies, who seems to believe that Western freedoms may be part of the problem, and that Chinese tyranny may be able to lead the way to a greener future.

The federal policy of trying to reduce energy dependence through the use of ethanol runs counter to free-market economics. Increasing the use of ethanol will not reduce dependence upon foreign energy sources, according to a research paper published by the National Academy of Science, which concluded this about ethanol: "Neither can [it] replace much petroleum without impacting food supplies."

 

The Environmental Protection Agency continues to pursue job-killing measures, reports the Competitive Enterprise Institute. The latest EPA endeavor involves revoking the Clean Water Act permit from the coal mine in Logan County, West Virginia — a measure expected to decrease investment in energy projects and destroy jobs.