An Oklahoma senator has issued a report asserting that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has halted action or “punted” on a number of regulations so President Obama can shore up votes for his November reelection bid. Sen. James Inhofe (R-Okla.), a ranking Republican on the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works, suggests that if the federal agency authorizes about a dozen regulations next year, it will “spell doom” for jobs and the economy as a whole.


Environmentalists and their governmental counterparts throughout the United States and Canada are expressing their outrage and threatening legal action against a project undertaken in international waters that was intended to lower the level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and increase the population of salmon. At the heart of the controversy are the actions of the Haida Salmon Restoration Corporation (HSRC), which spread 100 tons of iron dust in the ocean with the intention of boosting the level of plankton in the surrounding sea water — and thus increasing the food available for the surrounding salmon population.

Arctic wildlife biologist Charles Monnett, the scientist who galvanized the environmentalist polar bear conservation movement in 2006, is back in his old job with the Department of the Interior (DOI) after a two-year investigation into charges of data falsification in research stating that alarming numbers of polar bears are drowning due to melting sea ice caused by global warming.

Through a series of training and awareness programs, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is embarking on a $1.2-million expedition to offer “asthma-friendly homes” training and outreach programs to curb exposure to indoor contaminants. Focusing primarily on homes and schools, the EPA announced earlier this year 32 assistant agreements to state and local governments and non-profit groups for the air pollution-abatement project.

The expanding use of ethanol in U.S. oil production, prompted by government mandates that require the use of biofuel in gasoline, is escalating the price of corn while plaguing poor countries with rising food prices. Critics worldwide are now questioning the federal government’s ethanol mandates, as the use of American-produced corn for biofuel has added more than $6.5 billion to the food import bills of developing countries, particularly in North Africa and Central America.

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