The Pentagon wants bright college kids to help them design and perfect software that will allow government agents to quickly single out individuals from still photos and video footage of crowd scenes. As with most government projects, this particular operation has been given an innocuous and meaningless name: Innovation House Study.

Even amongst fiscal conservatives, defending curbside recycling is an almost knee-jerk reaction: Of course, it’s beneficial. But what if it doesn’t provide its claimed benefits?

Some of the biggest “Green” environmental organizations in the world engage in blatant deception and propaganda to fill their coffers, leaving destruction and ruined lives in their wake, according to Icelandic investigative journalist Magnus Gudmundsson. In an exclusive interview with The New American at the United Nations Rio+20 Conference on Sustainable Development last month, he also wondered whether the latest UN “sustainability” craze was simply more of the same fraud. 

In over 20 years of tracking non-governmental organizations’ (NGOs) environmental campaigns, Gudmundsson has documented a vast array of deliberate lies concocted by groups such as Greenpeace and other major players. He has also been one of the only journalists in the world to really cover the effects of the deception on the affected communities — especially in the Arctic.

Have you ever heard of a tech company called Neustar? Probably not, and that’s just the way the government wants to keep it. Neustar is a relatively new company that is playing a large, albeit secret, role in the expansion of the surveillance state. According to published reports, Neustar handles the law enforcement surveillance and user data requests for over 400 telecommunications companies. To accommodate their clients’ demands, Neustar maintains a database containing information on every cell phone in the United States — including yours.

Another American solar firm is purportedly in financial disarray after receiving millions of dollars in grants from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Only a year after it opened, the Amonix solar manufacturing plant located in North Las Vegas has idled production, leaving serious questions about the company’s financial viability and whether taxpayers will be burdened with another multi-million-dollar DOE-subsidized boondoggle.