delete keyWith the arrest of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange in London, what has been called the “first information war” has taken a critical turn. The U.S. government, furious at the publication of thousands of classified and confidential pieces of diplomatic correspondence, has every intention of making an example of Assange to deter other would-be tamperers with American state secrets. WikiLeaks, be it recalled, has also provided a window on U.S. actions in Iraq by releasing classified videos showing U.S. helicopters machine-gunning civilians and committing other atrocities. Wikileaks has certainly enraged the American empire before, but now, it seems, Rome-on-the-Potomac is determined to strike back.

Among the climate “solutions” proposed by scientists, officials, and others for the Cancun COP16 “global-warming” summit are ideas like a global “one-child policy” modeled on Communist China’s brutal system, a carbon rationing scheme for every person on Earth, world socialism, and a series of global taxes paid to the United Nations.

COP16 logoWhile United Nations global-warming dignitaries were invoking ancient Maya goddesses for help in hammering out a wealth-redistribution “climate” treaty, prominent columnists and publications around the world were heaping scorn and ridicule on the whole COP16 extravaganza currently underway in Cancun — even heralding the end of the whole “scam.”

computer twiligtIt’s no secret that the federal government — the FCC, in particular — has been seeking for years for ways to take control of the Internet. For a decade and a half now, the Web has been a blessed enclave of liberty where the grasping hand of the state, with its stifling regulations and debilitating taxes, has been unable to penetrate. Now, according to the Washington Times, the feds are at it again, and this time, they’re serious:

The multi-billion dollar “market” for so-called “carbon credits” could be in jeopardy as the 1997 Kyoto Protocol, which created the framework for the emissions-limiting scheme, expires in 2012 — with no apparent successor agreement in sight.