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computerPresident Barack Obama is close to adding another czar to the growing number of czars in his administration. This one will be a cyberczar (otherwise known as the National Cybersecurity Adviser) to coordinate cybersecurity efforts and regulate the Internet.

cap and tradeAt 3:47 a.m. on June 26, the Rules Committee reported out the 1,100-page American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009 for debate in the House of Representatives. Later in the day, its sponsor — Henry Waxman (D-Calif.), chairman of the House Committee on Energy and Commerce — added a “managers’ amendment” traditionally employed to clean up technical errors. But in this instance, the amendment was 300 pages of changes that modified the language of dozens of sections of the original document.

Vivek KundraThe federal government announced on September 15 that it will adopt cloud computing to cut costs and reduce the environmental impact of its computer systems. As a first step, the administration launched Apps.gov, an online shopping center for approved cloud computing services.

windmillTwo Danish experts in the field of wind energy will be in Washington for the next three days to speak on the subject of wind generated electricity. One would expect they are here to brag on the fact that their country is a leader in the field and that they already satisfy, as President Obama puts it, "20 percent of the electricity through wind power." One would be wrong in such an expectation. They are here to warn us about the dangers of putting our electricity needs in the wind power basket.

JupiterStanding outside on a clear night, people all over the world look up and see a sight familiar throughout the generations of mankind: the waxing and waning of the moon. Our moon has become a symbol of permanence; changes in its appearance, and the regularity of events such as solar and lunar eclipses can be accurately predicted for generations to come. But such seeming-constancy is not the case for every moon.

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