If Hillary Clinton had worked half as hard to protect the data on her e-mail server as she has worked to protect herself from the fallout for not protecting the server, she could still be the Democrat Party's assumptive nominee for president. And she wouldn't be the subject of an "extremely serious" investigation conducted by an FBI "A-team."

After the Charleston church massacre, a war was launched against the Confederate flag. With a rainbow flag having been found in the WDBJ shooter's apartment, should it also now be banned?

On August 24, the government of Mexico filed an amicus curiae brief in the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Texas (Austin Division) in support of a lawsuit filed against the Texas Department of State Health Services by a group of illegal aliens represented by several nonprofit civil rights organizations alleging that the state has violated the 14th Amendment’s Equal Protection Clause by rejecting their applications to obtain birth certificates for their U.S.-born children.

 

Hillary Clinton has a rare gift for dodging blame even when she "take[s] responsibility." Dogged by accusations that she both sent and received classified intelligence via her private e-mail server, the former secretary of state has run the gamut from denial to flippant sarcasm to a slippery non-admission that is so vague it would make Bill proud.

The most recent Department of Defense Law of War Manual, released on June 15, has come under fire from journalists for its guidelines that allow military commanders to treat journalists covering military operations as “unprivileged belligerents.” Members of the press and experts in military law say that this vague wording could be interpreted to expel members of the press from military bases — or even worse — detain journalists.

 

Page 1 of 824