Twenty-nine years ago, on September 1, 1983, Korean Air Lines Flight 007 (KAL 007) was shot down by the Soviet Union carrying 269 innocent passengers including 60 Americans and a sitting U.S. congressman, Democrat Rep. Larry McDonald of Georgia. It was widely reported, and much of the world believes, that everyone on board was killed. But family members of the victims and experts who spent years researching the matter are convinced that many survived and are still alive somewhere in Russia. Now, they want a new official investigation.

There have been various efforts to create a cyber-security measure that could garner enough bipartisan support to pass both chambers of Congress, but all have failed. Senate Intelligence Chairwoman Dianne Feinstein of California is now urging the president to implement cyber-security measures without congressional approval, by way of an executive order. Feinstein implores Obama to use his powerful position to circumvent Congress altogether and prepare an executive order that would protect the critical infrastructure.

15-term House member Edolphus Towns (D-N.Y.) has been milking the system for years, the latest being obtaining VIP treatment from Countrywide Financial and then denying it.

Freedom advocates breathed sigh of relief when a coalition of Senate Republicans and a few Democrats opposed the Cybersecurity Act of 2012 (S. 3414). Unfortunately, the recent setback of the Cybersecurity Act of 2012 has all the earmarks a false sense of security. The timing has created a false impression that Internet regulation legislation has failed for this session of Congress, but the 112th Congress is virtually certain to convene a lame duck session after the election.

 

The House Oversight Committee investigating the Obama administration’s deadly “Fast and Furious” gun-running scandal is seeking enforcement of formal charges against disgraced Attorney General Eric Holder in U.S. Court, demanding access to crucial documents that are being unlawfully withheld as part of what investigators say amounts to a cover up. The announcement of the widely anticipated legal maneuver was welcomed by activists seeking truth and accountability, but more must still be done. 

Meanwhile, pressure is building on the whole Department of Justice as a new book claims “team Obama” launched its vicious federal war on California’s lawful medical-marijuana industry to distract from the exploding weapons-trafficking scandal. The alleged strategy to deflect attention, however, appears to have backfired, leading to a separate bipartisan backlash and declining support even among some of the administration’s most ardent supporters.