Despite predictable outcries against a plan advertised as a $5.3-trillion cut in federal spending over the next 10 years, House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan (R-Wis., left) says voters are ready to embrace the kind of cuts he has outlined in his proposed budget. Appearing on the "Morning Joe" show on MSNBC shortly before the release of his spending plan Tuesday, Ryan acknowledged he had been advised by some of his Republican colleagues not to propose deep spending cuts, especially to Medicare, in an election year. But, the budget chairman argued, the mounting national debt and growing concerns about its effect on the nation's economy have changed the public's attitude toward spending cuts.

According to CSN News March 2, House Rep. Mike Pompeo (R-Kan., left) has again introduced legislation to repeal all energy tax credits. H.R. 3308, The Energy Freedom and Economic Prosperity Act was first introduced in the House last May by Pompeo. The legislation is now under review in the House Ways and Means Committee, and a Senate version was introduced by Senator Jim DeMint (R-S.C.) and Senator Mike Lee (R-Utah) earlier this month.

With the publishing of a “white paper” about the housing market, Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke has rankled some Republicans that suggestions made appear to have transgressed some line of propriety that separates monetary policy, fiscal policy, and the Fed’s “independence.”

A shave and a haircut will cost you more than two bits just about anywhere, but it’ll run you over two Hamiltons at the U.S. Senate barbershop — more than double what barbers in some parts of the country charge. Yet despite these high prices, the shop, which is supposed to be self-sustaining, ended up $300,000 in the hole last year and got its own taxpayer bailout, proving once again that government is incapable of performing even the smallest tasks cheaply and competently.

In a recent editorial entitled “Regulation without Representation,” Investors Business Daily pointed out that a new federal rule or regulation is published every two hours, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. But most of them escape the notice of Congress. Congress itself passes fewer than 200 in each session, the rest are promulgated by agencies in the Executive Branch in contravention of explicit instructions in the Constitution.