A Memorial Day display of 79 crosses erected on May 20 alongside a state highway in Hiram, Georgia, to honor the 79 Paulding County residents who died in America’s wars was temporarily removed following a complaint from a caller — but replaced after a city council vote.

Gun-rights groups filed suit against Seattle's gun and ammo tax, but the tax was upheld. On January 4, the plaintiffs sent the lawsuit to a state Court of Appeals for review. A decision is expected by late summer or early fall.

An attorney was arrested for "obstruction" when she remained silent during a traffic stop. She was later released and is suing the officer, the police department, and the State of New Jersey.

The Constitutional Sheriffs and Peace Officers Association (CSPOA), which The New American has been reporting about for at least five years, has come to the attention of the major media.

After WSBTV aired the story of a business owner in the Atlanta Metro area who requires all of his employees to get a permit and carry a firearm in the office for self-defense, it went viral and reporters inundated him with questions as to his reasoning.

Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia told law students at the University of Minnesota that he would not be surprised if the Supreme Court would declare all states' death penalty laws unconstitutional.

The governor of Montana signed a law preventing police from accepting money and material from the federal government.

A municipal judge in Ohio prohibited a defendant from mentioning the U.S. Constitution during a trial. 

The Second Amendment scores another victory as Texas is about to join 44 other open carry states.

After a flurry of protests brought attention to New Jersey’s draconian restrictions on possession of firearms, retired schoolteacher George Van Gilder will not be facing trial for his possession of an 18th-century flintlock pistol.