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It will probably come as no surprise to readers of The New American that the views upheld by constitutional conservatives are not widely respected in the circles of the media elite. From the scorn heaped upon The John Birch Society from its inception to the loathing lavished on "Tea Party" activists in the past two years, having the audacity to propose that our elected representatives actually conduct themselves according to the rule of law may be rejected as a form of naïveté or (ironically) as a threat to the nation.

TSA protesterThe Department of Homeland Security is gathering names and information about anti-Transportation Security Administration activists, members of the media, and other supposed troublemakers for investigation and possible tracking, according to an internal DHS memo cited by security expert and Northeast Intelligence Network Director Douglas Hagmann.

Stop the Con-Con!According to a Gallup poll published on October 13, 2010, 59 percent of Americans think the federal government has too much power. This represents a dramatic, 20-percent increase over the past seven years. Furthermore, we’ve all witnessed an amazing series of federal power grabs in the past few years: the bailouts, the government takeovers, the stimulus bill, the healthcare “reform” law known as ObamaCare, the financial regulatory law, the EPA’s regulation of greenhouse gases, the trillion-dollar deficits. Among constitutionalists, libertarians, Tea Party activists, Republicans, and Independents, the common expression is that our federal government is “out of control.”

On November 21, two and a half hours after landing in Northern Kentucky on a return trip from Paris, Matt Kernan was allowed to leave the Cincinnati airport without having had to endure either the “backscatter” (AIT) scanner or pat-down screening procedures that have enraged American air travelers for weeks.

The November 22 New York Times editorial titled “Our Constitutional Court” included the surprising observation that the Supreme Court "… rewrite[s] the terms it uses to fulfill the constitutional mission of limiting each branch of government. Redefining itself as a constitutional court, this court seems limited only by limits it opts to recognize."

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