Harvard YardThe ideologically diverse crowd of 300-400 attending the Harvard University Constitutional Convention Conference (ConConCon) couldn't agree upon even one agenda item to seek the nation's first constitutional convention in more than 200 years. Organized by Harvard Law School Professor Lawrence Lessig, the September 24-25 ConConCon was billed as an opportunity for organizations from the left and right to meet together and "to discuss the advisability and feasibility of organizing towards a Constitutional Convention" under Article V of the U.S. Constitution. Attendees at the Cambridge, Massachusetts, conference included a host of left-wing groups along with leaders of the Tea Party Patriots and representatives of the Cato and Goldwater Institutes.

The American Jobs Act has already faced a flurry of criticism for a variety of reasons, including the cost and the likelihood that it will do little to create jobs. The most recent cause for criticism, however, follows the revelation that the bill could potentially destroy state sovereignty.

Connecticut Supreme Court Justice Richard N. Palmer (left), part of a 4-3 majority in a controversial ruling that upheld the taking of the homes of several New London residents to make room for a private commercial development, apologized years later to the woman who led the fight against it. In a September 18 article in the Hartford Courant, Jeff Benedict, author of  a book about the case, called Little Pink House, recalled witnessing the apology after a talk he gave on the subject at a dinner honoring the Connecticut Supreme Court at the New Haven Lawn Club in May 2010. Benedict was talking with Susette Kelo, the lead plaintiff in Kelo v. New London, when Judge Palmer approached.   

Shequita Walker, a 40-year old disabled woman from Atlanta, Georgia, asserts that she was arrested merely for sitting outside in a chair. Her account of the events indicates that she was sitting outside when she was approached by a police officer, who asked her to move from her chair. When she refused, she said she was thrown to the ground and arrested.

The fiscal and monetary crisis confronting America today is more than an economic problem, it is a threat to our liberties and the nation's sovereignty, constitutional lawyer Edwin Vieira said at a Constitution Day celebration in Portsmouth, N.H. on Sunday. Unless a sound currency is established, the coming economic collapse will result in America "falling victim to a domestic totalitarian police state with the loss of American sovereignty and independence and lead to some sort of regional or global system, i.e. a new world order," he said.