Constitution

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts is on the verge of passing a new law that will circumvent the Electoral College system so that future elections will be determined by the national popular vote. One vote remains in the Massachusetts state senate before the National Popular Vote bill is signed into action by Governor Deval Patrick. The legislation will allow all of the state’s electoral votes to go to the candidate who receives the most votes nationally. It is part of an effort lead by a group called National Popular Vote (NPV) that is gaining momentum across the country to obliterate the Electoral College.

The wisdom of the Founding Fathers of the American Republic was such that the preservation of religious liberty was enunciated in the first clause of the First Amendment of the Bill of Rights: “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof.” The application of those 16 words has often been a matter of debate, but the preservation of freedom of religion has been understood as numbered among the fundamental liberties of free people living under the U.S. Constitution.

Fox Business Channel host of Freedom Watch Andrew Napolitano has renewed a call for the indictment of former President Bush and Vice President Cheney for attacks on the U.S. Constitution in a July 12 C-SPAN interview with leftist consumer advocate Ralph Nader. “It was blatantly unconstitutional and in some cases criminal,” the former New Jersey Superior Court judge told Nader. “They should have been indicted. They absolutely should have been indicted, for torturing, for spying, for arresting without warrant.” Nader then followed up Napolitano's statement with a clarification question:

Reports from the Empire State indicate that the National Guard is assisting local law enforcement in Albany, that state's capital city, to search and seize weapons from citizens — an apparent violation of the Fourth Amendment and the Posse Comitatus Act.

The Fourth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution is clear: “The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.”

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