cellphoneThe War on Drugs has been chipping away at the Bill of Rights for decades. If a January 3 California Supreme Court ruling is upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court, the drug war will thus have completely eviscerated the Fourth Amendment, which states: “The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.”

Roger WickerIn an effort to reaffirm the Tenth Amendment, which reserves to the states those powers  not delegated to the federal government by the Constitution, Republican Senator Roger Wicker of Mississippi introduced the Wicker Bill during the 2010 congressional lame-duck session. Dubbed "The Restoring the 10th Amendment Act," the Wicker bill is described by its author as “a step toward restoring states' rights.”

Barack ObamaPresident Obama has once again circumvented the U.S. Congress as it stands in the way of his agenda — this time, by directly appointing four new U.S. ambassadors whose appointments were otherwise stalled by lawmakers for months, as well as the U.S. Public Printer and the Deputy Attorney General. Fox News writes, “The White House announced Wednesday that Obama would use his power to make recess appointments to fill envoy posts to Azerbaijan, Syria, and NATO allies Turkey and the Czech Republic.”

The ACLU of New Jersey has been granted a temporary court order forcing the city council of Point Pleasant Beach, New Jersey, to halt its 60-year practice of opening council meetings with prayer.

American proponents of government secrecy are calling for WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange to be assassinated or imprisoned, even if it means creating a new law to do it. And that is exactly what anti-WikiLeaks activists in the federal government are working on right now.