As the Obama administration is poised to enact a sweeping infringement of the right of Americans to keep and bear arms in the states bordering Mexico, the only thing which may stand in the way is not the Republican-dominated House of Representatives, but the Federal Paperwork Reduction Act.

Several weeks ago, a liberal organization known as the Justice Movement asked Congress to pass legislation authorizing the formation of a constitutional convention in Philadelphia on July 4, 2011. This organization mistakenly believes that Congress is authorized under Article V of the Constitution to convene a constitutional convention with the approval of two-thirds of the House of Representatives as well as that of the Senate.

The recent publishing of an interview of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia conducted last September is eliciting cries of “misogynist” from pundits and progressives, and partisans.

cellphoneThe War on Drugs has been chipping away at the Bill of Rights for decades. If a January 3 California Supreme Court ruling is upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court, the drug war will thus have completely eviscerated the Fourth Amendment, which states: “The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.”

Roger WickerIn an effort to reaffirm the Tenth Amendment, which reserves to the states those powers  not delegated to the federal government by the Constitution, Republican Senator Roger Wicker of Mississippi introduced the Wicker Bill during the 2010 congressional lame-duck session. Dubbed "The Restoring the 10th Amendment Act," the Wicker bill is described by its author as “a step toward restoring states' rights.”