A Wisconsin federal judge was in rare form yesterday when she declared the National Day of Prayer to be unconstitutional. U.S. District Judge Barbara Crabb defended her decision when she wrote, “It is because the nature of prayer is so personal and can have such a powerful effect on a community that the government may not use its authority to try to influence an individual’s decision whether and when to pray.”

As reported previously, Starbucks has found itself enmeshed in the struggle between activists who are attempting to deprive Americans of their Second Amendment liberties, and those who are trying to uphold those constitutionally guaranteed rights.

phoneU.S. District Court Chief Judge Vaughn Walker ruled March 31 that the executive branch cannot flatly ignore the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act of 1978 in a fiery decision that lambasted both the Obama and Bush administrations for dishonesty in its proceedings. Walker wrote that both administrations had engaged in “intransigence” and a consistent “refusal to cooperate with the court’s orders punctuated by their unsuccessful attempts to obtain untimely appellate review.”

Obama signing“Side-stepping Senate confirmation,” declared the New York Times. “This is going to make problems worse,” exclaimed Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.). “What this is going to do is cause the election of a lot more Republicans ... in November who are determined to come in and provide some checks and balances in Washington to stop the overreaching of the government,” hollered Lamar Alexander, (R-Tenn.).

Judge James Robertson of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia ordered on March 22 that Mohamedou Ould Slahi, a native of Mauritania, be released from the U.S. military prison at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba.