Citing the Tenth Amendment, states’ rights, and even threats to national sovereignty, a coalition of some of Oklahoma’s most conservative lawmakers sent a letter to state Attorney General Scott Pruitt this week asking him to drop the federal lawsuit against Colorado voters’ 2012 decision to end marijuana prohibition. The group of state legislators, while making clear that they do not support pot, warned that the implications of the recently filed case would extend far beyond the controversial substance — potentially even threatening nullification efforts in Oklahoma and other states if successful at the Supreme Court. If the attorney general decides to pursue the case anyway, constituents of the Oklahoma lawmakers are urging them to file a brief defending Colorado’s right to self-government in the Supreme Court.

The Washington Times published two news stories December 30 in which America's Founding Fathers would have seen as a disturbing pattern.

The paper reported that the pace of military-grade equipment shipments to local police stations has accelerated in the wake of the Ferguson, Missouri riots, and that Maryland State Police have been targeting out-of-state handgun owners on highways for technical violations of state gun control laws.

While one can certainly sympathize with Sen. Tom Coburn and other "conservative" proponents of a constitutional convention who are sincerely concerned with any infringement on the rights of the states by the expanding federal government, what the nation needs now is not a new Constitution, or a multitude of amendments. Federal government officials simply need to follow our present Constitution.

Just in the last few weeks, the Obama administration has proposed or imposed over 1,200 new regulations on the American people that will add even more to the already crushing $2 trillion per year cost burden of the federal regulatory machine. 

 

 

 

On Christmas Eve, December 24, the United Nations' global gun-grabbing effort, the Arms Trade Treaty, entered into force.