As federal courts engage in what Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore described as “judicial tyranny” to “desecrate” marriage in violation of the state and U.S. Constitution, a constitutional showdown of historic proportions is currently underway in Alabama. At issue is whether federal courts have the constitutional authority to redefine the institution of marriage and impose it on unwilling states. Justice Moore insists they do not, and over the weekend issued an order prohibiting lower-court judges in Alabama from issuing “marriage” licenses to homosexual couples. A handful of probate judges in Alabama have defied Justice Moore’s order, the state constitution, and the overwhelmingly expressed will of the people. However, most have refused to issue marriage licenses to homosexuals so far as the legal showdown plays out.

A member of the Virginia House of Delegates who is also a gay rights advocate sees an Article V constitutional convention as a chance to change the Constitution.

The Alaska state legislature is considering a bill requiring study of the Constitution in school.

The IRS hired hundreds of former employees who had been fired or resigned over issues like helping themselves to taxpayers' information, being absent without leave, or even failing to file their own tax returns, an audit found.

In what has been described as a new front in the battle over same-sex marriage, legislators in several states under judicial orders to confer marital status on same-sex couples have introduced bills to forbid state or local officials from issuing marriage licenses to couples of the same gender.