In the final installment of this three-part series we examine the constitutional considerations of a national popular vote initiative.

The Supreme Court will decide whether to allow a constitutional challenge to the government's warrantless surveillance to go forward.  

In Part 1 of this series, we reported on the efforts underway by many to abolish the electoral college and to have the winner of the upcoming presidential election decided by a national popular vote (NPV). Several states have passed — and many others are considering — bills that would effect a de facto destruction of the Constitution's mandate regarding the method for election of the president.

In a three-part series, we explore the threat to the Constitution posed by a call for the winner of the presidential election to be decided by a national popular vote.

As the national scandal over United Nations-linked “elections monitors” continues to grow after Texas threatened potential prosecutions, the international outfit deploying “observers” demanded that the Obama administration come to its aid. The State Department promptly claimed that the UN-affiliated monitors would have “full” diplomatic immunity. But in the Lone Star State, officials fired back and upped the ante: Don’t mess with Texas.

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