In a document filed September 4 in the D.C. District Court, the Obama administration argues that there is no “reasonable expectation of privacy” in a person’s cellphone GPS data. The president’s lawyers insist they do not need a warrant to request cellphone company records regarding a customer’s movements and location as tracked by their signal towers.

In its argument against a motion filed to suppress the government’s use of a defendant’s cellphone location data, the administration claims the customer tracking records kept by cellphone service providers are no different from other business-related “third-party records” such as store receipts, and customers have no legal basis for any additional expectation of privacy.

The feds are making their case for warrantless tracking of citizens in a re-trial of an accused drug dealer whose conviction was thrown out by the Supreme Court in its decision in the case of United States v. Jones.

 

 

 

President Obama is tearing the shroud of secrecy off his once hush-hush death-by-drone program.

From his interview with Ben Swann, host of Fox 19’s Reality Check, to his sit-down with CNN’s chief White House correspondent Jessica Yellin, the kill-list compiler-in-chief is gradually exposing details of the principles he purportedly follows before targeting someone for assassination.

U.S. District Court Chief Mark L. Wolf, chief judge of the U.S. District Court in Massachusetts, says taxpayers must pay for a murderer's sex-change operation because denying sex-change is cruel and unusual punishment.

The Tenth Amendment Center (TAC) reports that “last week, the Allegan County, Michigan. Board of Commissioners passed a resolution opposing federal kidnapping powers.”

The powers referred to in the TAC article are those included in relevant provisions of the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) signed into law on December 31, 2011 by President Barack Obama.

For the second time this year, the Paul family has been harassed by the Transportation Security Administration. Rep. Ron Paul, his wife, and granddaughter were stopped by eight TSA workers at a small airport in Clearwater, Florida, and told they must be screened. According to the agents, the screening was necessary because Mitt Romney might be nearby.

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