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Attorney Van Irion of the Liberty Legal Foundation (LLF) filed an appeal to a Georgia superior court to review and overturn the decision by Georgia’s Secretary of State Brian Kemp (left) to keep Barack Obama’s name on the state’s 2012 primary ballot. Irion claimed that Kemp’s decision was based on a faulty ruling by administration law Judge Michael Mahili who threw out testimonies presented by Irion and two other attorneys in a hearing on January 26th.

Attorneys for churches meeting in New York City public school buildings have won a court order barring the city from evicting the congregations for at least 10 days. The Alliance Defense Fund (ADF), a conservative legal advocacy group representing the churches in Bronx Household of Faith v. Board of Education of the City of New York, said that it had succeeded in getting the restraining order while a U.S. District Court considers the constitutional arguments in the case. As reported earlier in The New American, the city’s school board had banned the longtime practice of allowing churches to rent space on weekends in school buildings that would otherwise sit vacant.

Hundreds of families in the state of Maryland have just seen their source of fresh, raw milk dry up thanks to the U.S. government. The Justice Department, at the urging of the Food and Drug Administration, convinced a federal judge to impose a permanent injunction on Pennsylvania Amish farmer Dan Allgyer prohibiting him from selling his milk to willing customers on the other side of the Mason-Dixon Line.

Another brave state legislator has joined the resistance to federal tyranny by defending the constitutional right of states to govern themselves.

 On February 3,  Oklahoma Rep. Charles Key (R-Oklahoma City, left) offered a bill that would officially request that the Congress of the United States repeal Sections 1021 and 1022 of the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA). Furthermore, the legal effect of those two sections would be void in Oklahoma.

Georgia’s Supreme Court has overturned a law banning advertising for assisted suicide, ruling that it unconstitutionally restricts free speech. The legislature had enacted the law in 1994 in an attempt to keep “right to die” proponents such as Dr. Jack Kevorkian from offering their services in the state.

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