About a year ago, a federal appeals court ordered the deeply unpopular Transportation Security Administration (TSA) to obey the law and hold public hearings on its widely loathed “naked body scanners.” The massive bureaucracy flouted the judicial order and has so far failed to comply. This week, however, the court demanded that the Department of Homeland Security explain itself by the end of the month.

A coalition of TSA critics including the Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC) originally sought to have the nude scanners removed from airports on constitutional grounds, alleging a clear violation of the Fourth Amendment’s protection from “unreasonable searches and seizures.” Other opponents also said the pornographic machines violate the right to privacy.

Opponents of Sharia Law think the Obama administration will ditch the First Amendment to protect Islam. And Rep. Trent Franks (R-Ariz.) put Assistant Attorney General Tom Perez on the hot seat during a hearing held by the House Judiciary Committee’s Subcommittee on the Constitution.

There is significant evidence that neither Senator Marco Rubio of Florida nor Governor Bobby Jindal of Louisiana is a natural born citizen as required by the U.S. Constitution for holding the office of president.

In it decision in the case of the United States v. Oliva, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals held that the federal government may remotely convert cellphones into roving bugs.

Citizens of Michigan continue to press for passage of a state law that would nullify the execution of the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) within the boundaries of the Great Lakes State. One such effort was begun by Michigan Representative Tom McMillin on June 14 when he introduced his bill to prevent the arrest and indefinite detention of citizens of his state under the authority of relevant provisions of the NDAA.