Imagine that the U.S. government had the power to scour the reams of public records and collect and collate every bit of personal information about every citizen of this country. Now imagine that any of the various intelligence and security agencies within the government could combine that data with any other information about a person that has been posted to a social media website or compiled by one of the many data aggregating companies that keep tabs on all of us.

Kentucky Senator Rand Paul's bill to protect citizens from surveillance by drones needs 48 more cosponsors in order to rein in the Supreme Court's approvals of such surveillance.

About a year ago, a federal appeals court ordered the deeply unpopular Transportation Security Administration (TSA) to obey the law and hold public hearings on its widely loathed “naked body scanners.” The massive bureaucracy flouted the judicial order and has so far failed to comply. This week, however, the court demanded that the Department of Homeland Security explain itself by the end of the month.

A coalition of TSA critics including the Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC) originally sought to have the nude scanners removed from airports on constitutional grounds, alleging a clear violation of the Fourth Amendment’s protection from “unreasonable searches and seizures.” Other opponents also said the pornographic machines violate the right to privacy.

Opponents of Sharia Law think the Obama administration will ditch the First Amendment to protect Islam. And Rep. Trent Franks (R-Ariz.) put Assistant Attorney General Tom Perez on the hot seat during a hearing held by the House Judiciary Committee’s Subcommittee on the Constitution.

There is significant evidence that neither Senator Marco Rubio of Florida nor Governor Bobby Jindal of Louisiana is a natural born citizen as required by the U.S. Constitution for holding the office of president.