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In a court case sure to go down in history for one of the most bizarre rulings, a Wisconsin judge has held that American citizens do not have a "fundamental right to produce or consume foods of their choice." The decision was so shocking that the Farm-to-Consumer Legal Defense Fund asked the judge to issue a clarification of the ruling.

The National Review touts itself as a conservative publication. It consistently espouses what it considers right-of-center policy positions, as well as promoting the popularity of “conservative” candidates.
 
 
There is little doubt that given the thickness of the fog of hubris that permeates every office of that periodical that it sincerely believes that its positions are consistent with the Constitution, as well. That is to say, were one to ask the journalists who write for the National Review if they were constitutionalists, they would likely respond, to a man, in the affirmative.

Nevada has long been known as the easiest place in America to get a divorce — and a quick marriage. After a couple has had a “quickie” marriage and the marriage license has been mailed to them, the union is still not technically valid until either a clergyman or a justice of the peace in the state has performed a marriage ceremony and the officiant and the couple have signed the marriage license and it has been mailed to the proper government agency for validation.

Obama and BushPresidents Bush and Obama have created a vigorous public debate since the September 11 attacks over whether suspects in the “war on terror” are entitled to a regular criminal trial, court-martial (the regular military justice system), or a “military commission” trial, or whether they are entitled to a trial at all. A “military commission” is traditionally an executive branch (or Article II) court, created to try war criminals in a time and place where there are no criminal or ordinary military courts to try suspects. But Congress has explicitly authorized them twice since the September 11 attacks.

Harvard YardThe ideologically diverse crowd of 300-400 attending the Harvard University Constitutional Convention Conference (ConConCon) couldn't agree upon even one agenda item to seek the nation's first constitutional convention in more than 200 years. Organized by Harvard Law School Professor Lawrence Lessig, the September 24-25 ConConCon was billed as an opportunity for organizations from the left and right to meet together and "to discuss the advisability and feasibility of organizing towards a Constitutional Convention" under Article V of the U.S. Constitution. Attendees at the Cambridge, Massachusetts, conference included a host of left-wing groups along with leaders of the Tea Party Patriots and representatives of the Cato and Goldwater Institutes.

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