New York Police Commissioner Joe Kelly (left) is considering the latest in technology — Terahertz Imaging Detection (TID) — to be mounted on police cars and allowing them to roam the streets of New York looking for people carrying guns. The NYPD, sometimes referred to as the world’s “seventh largest army” with 35,000 uniformed officers, already does a brisk business frisking potential suspects, with little pushback. In the first quarter of last year, 161,000 New Yorkers were stopped and interrogated, with more than nine out of 10 of them found to be innocent. And there are cameras already in place everywhere: in Manhattan alone there are more than 2,000 surveillance cameras watching for alleged miscreants.

Last Friday, two pro-business organizations filed motions in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, challenging the constitutionality of President Barack Obama’s recess appointments. The two advocacy groups, the National Right to Work Foundation (NRWF) and the National Federation of Independent Business (NFIB), argue in their pleading that as the Senate was in session, the Constitution does not empower the President to make appointments without their advice and consent.

Supreme CourtCalling it the “most significant religious liberty decision in two decades,” the New York Times announced the Supreme Court’s decision to uphold the “ministerial exception” whereby churches and other religious organizations are exempt from governmental interference in their hiring and firing practices. In a unanimous 9-0 decision on January 11, the Court said that churches have an overriding “interest ... in choosing who will preach their beliefs, teach their faith and carry out their mission.”

GuantanamoThe 10th anniversary of the opening of the Guantanamo Bay Detention Facility was Wednesday.

In what some legal analysts consider the most significant decision covering religious freedom in the last 20 years, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled January 11 that a religious organization has the right to fire an employee under the 1964 Civil Rights Act’s “ministerial exception” clause.

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