Voters in Colorado, Oregon, and Washington State will vote on proposals next month to nullify unconstitutional federal statutes by legalizing marijuana for recreational use, setting up a potential showdown between the Obama administration and state governments that could increase interest in the U.S. Constitution’s Tenth Amendment. While the fate of Oregon’s measure remains uncertain, polls suggest Amendment 64 in Colorado and Initiative 502 in Washington State may well pass.   

President Obama's use of recess appointments to put three bureaucrats on the National Labor Relations Board, even though the Senate says it was not in recess, is causing a legal challenge to his abuse of executive power.

President Obama's latest executive order that allows the "freezing" of all accounts belonging to "sanctioned persons" in the US is one in a series of orders going back to President Washington.

Major Nidal Hasan, the man accused of the Ft. Hood shooting, has appealed a ruling demanding that he shave his beard before going to trial. Hasan asserts that the beard is a constitutionally protected religious practice.

On October 9, the Supreme Court denied review of an appeal court ruling upholding the constitutionality of the Federal Information Securities Amendments Act (FISA).

The FISA Amendments Act was signed into law by President George W. Bush on July 10, 2008 after being overwhelmingly passed 293 to 129 in the House and 69-28 in the Senate.

At issue in the case the Supreme Court refused to hear, Hepting, et al v. AT&T, et al, was the government’s use of provisions of FISA to grant retroactive protection from prosecution to several telecommunications giants including AT&T, Verizon, and Sprint. These companies aided the government in wiretapping the phones of subscribers without obtaining a warrant.