You are here: HomeU.S. NewsConstitution

Constitution

Obama“I taught the Constitution for 10 years. I believe in the Constitution, and I will obey the Constitution of the United States. We’re not going to use signing statements as a way of doing an end run around Congress.”
         — Barack Obama, May 18, 2008, at a campaign stop in Billings, Montana

In an effort to draw national attention to the federal government's intrusion into the everyday lives of its citizens, Oklahoman Kaye Beach has elected to take on the system. She refused to renew her driver’s license in protest of not only forced biometric enrollment — having her information shared with corporations and government agencies — but also the influence of international organizations on U.S. policies and laws. Her actions have initiated a full-fledged legal battle.

One of the quintessential ingredients of small-town America is the local civic group, an organization of individuals who attempt to better their community by influencing their local government. Of course, not everyone appreciates their efforts — especially politicians who prefer to do as they please without interference from the people they are supposed to be serving.

A Nevada man is suing the Department of Motor Vehicles after it denied his request for vanity license plates reading "GOPALIN," alleging that the plates violate the standard against "vulgarity." James Linlor, who requested the plates, is bringing the case for what he asserts to be political bias at the DMV.

Requests for vanity plates are measured against a standard that indicates those plates cannot include a message that may be deemed to be “contempt, ridicule, or superiority of … political affiliation.” According to the Nevada DMV, “GOPALIN” is “vulgar” and “inappropriate.”

On November 2, 1889, the Dakota Territory ceased to exist, becoming the states of North and South Dakota — or so the history books tell us.

Sign up for The New American daily highlights