“This will be the first time ever, since this whole thing began, that it will be looked on, on merit.” Carl Swensson, Republican Party Chairman of Clayton County, Georgia, spoke those words regarding the forthcoming judicial hearing of the case against the eligibility of Barack Hussein Obama to be President.

On December 29, 2011, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit declared unconstitutional a Washington State statute regulating the donation of money to political action committees (PACs). Specifically, the law in question prohibited PACs from accepting contributions in excess of $5,000 within 21 days of an election.

In his annual report on the federal judiciary published Saturday, Chief Justice John Roberts of the United States Supreme Court wrote the he has “complete confidence” in the ability of his fellow high court justices to determine the appropriate time to recuse themselves from cases wherein they may have personal interest.

Who will be in charge of the executive branch of government if Mitt Romney is our next President? Who will be making the decisions coming out of the White House, decisions affecting matters as crucial as the question of war or peace? When Romney ran for the 2008 nomination, he was asked a rather basic question by Chris Matthews of MSNBC during one of the many televised debates.