The U.S. Supreme Court agreed on June 24 to hear a case involving the validity of three recess appointments President Obama made to the National Labor Relations Board in January 2012. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit ruled in January that the appointments to the NLRB’s board, which normally has five members, were invalid. The court’s decision will be made during the High Court’s next term, which will start in October.

Texas Governor Rick Perry signed a bill into law June 14 that curtails the power of law enforcement and government to use drones to conduct surveillance on the citizens of the Lone Star State.

The Supreme Court handed down a decision on June 17 that has been ignored by most media outlets, despite its devastating effect on one of the most fundamental rights protected by the Constitution.

In a 5-4 ruling, the justices ruled that a person no longer has the right to remain silent as guaranteed by the Fifth Amendment. In relevant part, the Fifth Amendment mandates that no one “shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself.”

During testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee, FBI Director Robert Mueller admitted that the bureau has been using drones in domestic surveillance.

Google is challenging the federal government over gag orders on data requests, asserting that it has a constitutional right to speak about information it has been compelled to hand over to the government. On Tuesday, Google issued a legal filing wherein it invoked the First Amendment’s free speech protection against the longstanding gag orders over the data requests in an effort to revamp its reputation in the aftermath of news about the National Security Agency’s Internet surveillance.