Justin AmashIf you're like me, you've been looking for some definitive analysis of exactly what Congress did regarding the detainee policy in the conference report (final bill) on the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) that was passed by the House 283-136 on December 14 and by the Senate 86-13 on December 15.

Diane FeinsteinOn December 15, just hours after the Senate had passed the compromise version of the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), Senator Diane Feinstein (D-Calif., left)) introduced a bill, supported by several of her colleagues from across the aisle, to extract at least one of the sharpest teeth from the freedom-devouring monster created by the NDAA.

Despite protests that the legislation will negate centuries old rights guaranteed by the Constitution, the Senate Thursday passed a bill authorizing the arrest and imprisonment without charge or trial of terrorism suspects, including American citizens, anywhere in the world. The bill, called the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) also authorizes $662 billion in military spending. It has been sent to the White House, where President Obama is expected to sign it, perhaps as early as today (Friday). Obama had threatened to veto earlier versions of bill, but on Wednesday the White House announced the President was satisfied by amendments made by a House-Senate conference committee granting the President greater discretion in determining what terror suspects to hold in military confinement.

On Monday, the justices of the Supreme Court were very busy issuing orders and approving petitions.

Already having committed themselves to considering the constitutionality of the individual mandate of ObamaCare, and the legality of recent redistricting in Texas, the nation’s highest court has now agreed to review another controversial conflict between the Constitution and the law.

The White House has dropped the threat of a veto of the military authorization bill that would declare the entire world, including the U. S., "homeland," a battlefield and permit the imprisonment of terror suspects, including American citizens, indefinitely and without trial.