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Arguments in one of the lawsuits challenging Barack Obama’s eligibility to be President of the United States has finally worked its way through the California court system and will be heard by the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals on May 2.

Tea PartyFrom reading the news and listening to the talking heads, one might get the impression that the Tea Party movement consists of government-slashing radicals who are equally fed up with both the big-government Democrats and the slightly-smaller-government Republicans. A recent McClatchy-Marist poll, however, suggests that Tea Party members and sympathizers are far less Ron Paul and far more Mitt Romney.

Thanks to Donald Trump and his billion-dollar-network bully pulpit, the issue of President Obama’s birthplace (and the related issue of why he’s never released a long-form birth certificate) is not going away.

Earlier this week, mainstream media mainstay CNN published a story with the headline: “Who’s Really Eligible to be President?” In the opinion piece, the author, Gabriel "Jack" Chin, Professor of Law at the University of Arizona's Rogers College, immediately telegraphs his own take on the issue with the following opening paragraph:

Apparently when the Supreme Court ruled 8 to 1 in March that the Westboro Baptist Church had a constitutional right to protest military funerals, regardless of the deplorable nature of the protests, lawmakers decided it was their turn to attempt to redefine the Constitution.

The Topeka-based church attracted public attention after holding boisterous protests at the funerals of fallen U.S. military soldiers, where demonstrators declared military deaths to be God’s punishment for homosexuality. Protesters were seen bearing signs that read “Thank God for Dead Soldiers,” “God Hates Fags,” and “You’re going to Hell.”

The Michigan chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union is questioning the Michigan State Police's use of cellphone "extraction" devices. 

Specifically, the group claims that law enforcement is clandestinely using portable devices to secretly extract personal information from cell phones during routine stops. 
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