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On Saturday, January 29, the Nullify Now! 2011 tour began with a bang in Phoenix, Arizona. Hundreds of people gathered at the Sheraton Hotel in downtown Phoenix as the Tenth Amendment Center promoted nullification of unconstitutional acts by the federal government. With an array of reputable speakers like Arizona’s State Senator Sylvia Tenney Allen and The John Birch Society’s CEO, Art Thompson, the event proved to be an educational success.

Sen. David Vitter, R-La., and Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ken., are co-authoring a resolution to deny citizenship to anyone born in the United States "unless at least one parent is a legal citizen, legal immigrant, active member of the Armed Forces or a naturalized legal citizen." According to a statement jointly released by the pair of lawmakers.

Former Minnesota governor Jesse Ventura is set to wrestle with the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) and Department of Homeland Security (DHS) through a lawsuit he filed on Monday, according to The Hals Report for January 25. After enduring enhanced screening last November at a Minnesota airport, Ventura claims the TSA full-body scan and pat-down violated his privacy rights.

The Supreme Court of the United States has but modest status in the U.S. Constitution. The court is mentioned only in Article III, Section 1 and Section 2 of our founding document, and then just in passing. The office of Chief Justice exists mainly because after the impeachment of a President, it is that officer who presides over the Senate trial. In the Constitution, the very expression of this highest judicial body is not “Supreme Court,” but “supreme Court.”

 

Rep. Mike Turner, (R-Ohio) has introduced a proposed constitutional amendment to prohibit federal government ownership in private enterprises. Called the Preserving Capitalism in America Amendment, the amendment would prohibit the government from buying stock or equity in corporations.

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