The man charged with massacring nine churchgoers in Charleston, South Carolina, and shocking the rest of the world with an incomprehensibly vicious act of evil, has been variously described as a monster, a racist, a terrorist, a hate criminal, a neo-Nazi, an anti-Semite, a druggie, and more. Beyond that, a “manifesto” attributed to the alleged killer, Dylann Roof, 21, exposes the author of the screed as an anti-American collectivist race-monger obsessed with superficial characteristics such as skin color who harbored a bizarre wish to spark a “race war.” Ironically, though, despite agitation and hate spewing by some race mongers, the drug user’s massacre of innocent Christians brought many Americans of all races together across South Carolina and beyond like never before. In other words, Roof failed.

A United Nations group has called on the United States to take "urgent measures" to reduce gun violence.

President Obama and other prominent politicians are calling for greater gun control in the wake of the Charleston church shootings.

A shooter identified by the FBI as Dylann Storm Roof of Columbia, South Carolina, walked into a Wednesday night Bible study class at the historic Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston on June 17 and allegedly opened fire, killing the pastor, the Reverend Clementa C. Pinckney, and eight church members. Pinckney was also a member of the South Carolina State Senate, representing Senate District 45 as a Democrat.

 

As more is learned about the recent cyber-attacks on U.S. federal employee records by Chinese hackers, it is becoming increasingly clear that the problem is much worse than many previously thought. The breach included information about nearly all employees of the federal government and millions of persons with security clearances, as well as current and former congressional staffers.

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