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U.S. federal authorities have been quietly supporting certain Mexican criminal empires, especially the Sinaloa drug cartel, in a bid to solidify the syndicates’ reign as dominant powerbrokers in particular territories, according to leaked e-mails from a U.S.-based Mexican diplomat to the private intelligence firm Stratfor. If cartel chiefs cooperate with authorities, “governments will allow controlled drug trades,” the source wrote.

Other information unearthed so far in the leak, much coming from a variety of sources, was equally explosive. One 2011 e-mail from someone described by Stratfor as “a US law enforcement officer with direct oversight of border investigations,” for example, indicated that American troops were already operating in Mexico under the guise of the drug war.

A network of 77 "fusion" intelligence centers, set up around the country under the auspices of the federal Department of Homeland Security, has over the past decade uncovered little information that could be useful in defending the nation against terrorism. It also created numerous reports on the legal, everyday of activities of ordinary Americans, according to a Senate report released Tuesday.

A new wave of pressure is mounting on disgraced Attorney General Eric Holder to resign after an in-depth investigation by Univision, a Spanish-language media broadcaster, uncovered evidence that guns handed to drug cartels by the Obama administration under operation Fast and Furious were used to massacre Mexican youths in addition to U.S. federal agents. Despite already having been held in contempt of Congress for the ongoing cover-up, however, Holder has steadfastly refused to step down.

A Somali terror suspect who, authorities allege, is brave enough to recruit and help finance terrorists for missions abroad, is scared of ghosts.

That at least, is what a court heard in the African’s attempt to get out of jail.

The trial for Mahmoud Said Omar begins next week, but early this week he asked a judge to let him out of jail to seek a spiritual healer to  stop “seizures” and rid him of the jailhouse specters haunting him day and night.

From Bergen, New Jersey, to St. Louis, Missouri, to Salt Lake City, Utah, the merging of law enforcement moves along, applauded by a coterie of city leaders and well-meaning citizens. But will consolidation of local police departments and sheriffs’ offices mean taking control away from local citizens, chiefs of police, and sheriffs?

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