A Somali terror suspect who, authorities allege, is brave enough to recruit and help finance terrorists for missions abroad, is scared of ghosts.

That at least, is what a court heard in the African’s attempt to get out of jail.

The trial for Mahmoud Said Omar begins next week, but early this week he asked a judge to let him out of jail to seek a spiritual healer to  stop “seizures” and rid him of the jailhouse specters haunting him day and night.

From Bergen, New Jersey, to St. Louis, Missouri, to Salt Lake City, Utah, the merging of law enforcement moves along, applauded by a coterie of city leaders and well-meaning citizens. But will consolidation of local police departments and sheriffs’ offices mean taking control away from local citizens, chiefs of police, and sheriffs?

The U.S. Customs and Immigration Enforcement Agency (ICE) has a federal contract out to bid for 200 million rounds of automatic weapons ammunition for its agents, a figure that represents about 10,000 rounds for each of its 20,000 employees.

The highly anticipated Justice Department Inspector General report on the Obama administration’s deadly “Fast and Furious” scheme that armed Mexican cartels was released Wednesday, laying the blame largely on more than a dozen senior officials within the department and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives (ATF). Critics, however, are already tearing the “whitewash” document apart.

Following the adoption of a new state law on jury nullification in June, a New Hampshire jury nullified its first major felony marijuana case on September 14 when jurors decided to free Doug Darrell, a 59-year-old father of four grown children who was growing illegal plants in his backyard. Activists hailed the decision as a significant victory for the jury nullification movement, which aims to revive awareness about the power inherent in juries to protect citizens from overzealous prosecutors and bad laws by nullifying cases.