In an effort to combat the gun smuggling of Mexican drug cartels, law enforcement in the United States created “Operation Fast and Furious,” a.k.a. Project Gunrunner. The plan was intended to pursue the prosecution of the “entire cartel network.” Unfortunately, despite the seemingly good intentions of the plan, a recently released congressional report indicates that it has turned out to be another grand failure. Fox News indicates that the plan has ultimately “left a trail of blood and bodies throughout the Southwest.”

 

Following up on the publication of the “International Strategy for Cyberspace” by the Obama administration last month, the Pentagon clarified and expanded upon its intention to consider a computer attack as equivalent to a more traditional act of war.

The White House’s strategy made clear that:

Several days ago, the home of former Marine and Iraq combat veteran Jose Guerena was raided by local sheriffs in Pima County, Arizona, who were attempting to execute a narcotics search warrant. Unfortunately, the manner in which the SWAT team invaded Guerena’s home prompted Guerena to reach for his gun to protect himself and his family. Sheriffs then shot off 71 rounds and hit Guerena with 22, killing him. The department has officially taken responsibility for the fatal shooting.

New Mexico police are investigating the murder of a prominent businessman in Hidalgo County, and many who know the area believe his murderer is an illegal alien.

If you live in Tennessee you should think twice before giving your Netflix password to a friend.

On May 30, 2011, Governor Bill Haslam signed House Bill 1783/Senate Bill 1659 into law. The new statute, Public Chapter No. 348, criminalizes the use of the login information of an account for any “entertainment subscription services.” Such services include Netflix, the popular video-on-demand service, as well as Rhapsody, a similar site dedicated to streaming music.

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