The U.S. Senate committee investigating the massacre at Ford Hood in November 2009 has blamed the FBI for not stopping the Muslim Army major who murdered 13 Americans that day. Yet it was clear within days after the shooting that the Army had all evidence it needed to discipline Maj. Nidal Hasan before it was too late.

The shooting rampage in Detroit last week has spurred a re-thinking of so-called “community policing” — a method of making law enforcement appear accessible, friendly, and open to neighborhood folk. Such was par for the course in the 1950s, but then was abandoned in the volatile 1960s, when leftist radicals started inciting students and minorities to attack authority figures. School principals and college professors were barricaded in their offices; police and other law enforcement officers were called “pigs”; squad cars were bombed; anti-riot and SWAT teams were hit with rocks, bricks, and bottles. That the perpetrators of these early, bona fide “hate crimes” constituted but a relatively small, misguided few didn’t seem to make much difference to our nation’s leaders inasmuch as the ruckus could be exploited by an already left-leaning press. 

Outside a court hearing for the so-called “Underwear Bomber,” an attorney who was on board the targeted plane renewed a series of shocking accusations, claiming the U.S. federal government was behind the whole plot.   

Michael BloombergThe City of New York, as part of an effort of Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s administration, sent investigators to Arizona to purchase firearms at gun shows. According to news reports, on January 23, at the Crossroads of the West Gun Show in Phoenix, these men found that they could buy semiautomatic pistols even when they told the gun sellers that they could not pass the background checks.

Man is an incredibly inventive creature — almost especially, it seems, when his mind is bent to criminal purposes. Anyone who has seen the elaborate means convicts use to make weapons can attest to that. Thus it's no surprise that Mexican drug dealers are devising ever-more innovative methods of delivering their products to the U.S. 

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