When a police SWAT team and an FBI anti-terrorism squad arrive in force at a local church, people might understandably be alarmed. They might reasonably suspect it is in response to some imminent and mortal danger — a bomb threat, perhaps, or an international terrorist with an automatic weapon, holding a prayer meeting hostage.

The trial of Muzzammil Hassan for the 2009 murder of his wife, Aasiya, has ended with his conviction. Hassan — who fired three attorneys and finally ended up defending himself — was convicted by a jury that required only a hour’s deliberation to find the former television executive from upstate New York guilty of murder in the second degree.

The criminalization of ordinary life has become a sad reality in our statist society. Dena Long-Christensen should know. The 44-year-old Utah woman was arrested last month, fined and put in jail. Her crime? Selling flowers out of her home without a proper permit, in violation of the rules of the West Jordan Planning and Zoning Board of Salt Lake City. The process of arrest and conviction began when an enforcement bureaucrat observed her selling flowers in her home, and executed an affidavit to that effect.

arizona shootingWhile many fled the horrific scene of the Tucson, Arizona, shooting on January 8, a number of others heroically stayed. While some of those good Samaritans did not live to tell their tales, those brave individuals are being hailed as heroes nonetheless.

The U.S. Senate committee investigating the massacre at Ford Hood in November 2009 has blamed the FBI for not stopping the Muslim Army major who murdered 13 Americans that day. Yet it was clear within days after the shooting that the Army had all evidence it needed to discipline Maj. Nidal Hasan before it was too late.

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