Those men and women who have given their final breath to the defense of America deserve surely deserve respect from all Americans. We may disagree about the cause of our country in the particular war in which they served.

Though Faisal Shahzad has not been seen in more than a week, he still remains a hot topic — and subject of both controversy and curiosity. Shahzad is the Pakistan/American suspect who drove a bomb-laden Nissan Pathfinder into Times Square on Saturday, May 1, with the intention of having it explode in that busy and crowded area.

If you needed another example of public officials woefully unaware of restraints on government power, look no further than the city of Chicago. The Austin Weekly News reported on April 28th that State Representative LaShawn Ford (D) is calling for the deployment of National Guard units on the streets of the Windy City to deal with escalating gang violence. Ford wants the military to augment the 13,400 strong Chicago Police Force, which is already the second largest in the nation.

Remember the Transportation Safety Administration’s repeated assurances that their full-body scanners at airports would not show the most intimate details of a person’s anatomy? Well, NBC reported that one of the TSA’s finest has just put the lie to that:

A TSA worker in Miami was arrested for aggravated battery after police say he attacked a colleague who’d made fun of his small genitalia after he walked through one of the new high-tech security scanners during a recent training session.

On May 5, Faisal Shahzad, the 30-year-old son of a retired senior Pakistani vice air marshal, waived his right to a speedy arraignment, which might be a sign of his continuing cooperation with investigators. American officials also said on that day that they now feel it is possible the Pakistani Taliban aided and abetted Shahzad’s car bombing attempt in Times Square, a scenario they were wary of believing just days earlier, when they believed any such claim might have been just be an opportunistic grab for attention.

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