U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) officials have filed a brief in federal district court in opposition to a historian’s bid to unseal records pertaining to the Watergate political scandal in the 1970s, which led to the resignation of President Richard Nixon. While the DOJ agrees that some of the Watergate papers should be released, it remains steadfastly opposed to making public the documents related to wiretap information, claiming that it is safeguarding the privacy rights of innocent people.

The Watergate scandal dates back to an incident on June 17, 1972, when five men affiliated with the Nixon reelection campaign and the CIA were caught breaking into the offices of the Democratic National Committee in the Watergate office complex in Washington, D.C. and arrested. The arrests led to a major cover-up in an attempt to prevent the burglars from being tied to President Nixon.

It’s been about a year since a North Dakota man was arrested after a local SWAT team tracked him down using a Predator drone it borrowed from the Department of Homeland Security.

Although the story has not been widely reported, Rodney Brossart became one of the first American citizens (if not the first) arrested by local law enforcement with the use of a federally owned drone aerial surveillance vehicle after holding the police at bay for over 16 hours.

The bankruptcy trustee in charge of liquidating MF Global issued a report today that there "may be valid claims" against CEO Jon Corzine.

As a shadowy collection of the world’s power brokers gathers in Chantilly, Virginia, for the elite Bilderberg conference this weekend under unprecedented media scrutiny, activists from across the political spectrum are arguing that U.S. citizens attending the controversial confab are potentially committing a felony by violating the Logan Act. And while the chances of charges being brought anytime soon are probably slim, anti-Bilderberg protesters admit, more than a few critics of the meeting are still loudly calling for federal prosecutions to bring any and all perpetrators to justice.

The Florida judge overseeing the case of George Zimmerman, charged with second-degree murder in the February shooting death of Trayvon Martin, revoked bail and ordered the defendant to surrender himself to authorities within 48 hours. Prosecutors alleged that Zimmerman — who says he shot Martin in self-defense — had not revealed money raised from supporters through online donations, or the existence of a second passport. His defense team, however, said there was no intention to mislead the court.  

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