So far, the great Thanksgiving protest against the TSA has been a turkey. As of midday Wednesday, only a few scattered protesters have been reported at airports nationwide, with very few travelers (at least according to the TSA) opting out of the full body scans, which amount to virtual strip searches of men, women, and children. Though some passengers are grumbling at the new security, few have been willing to stand up for themselves as John Tyner, a software engineer from San Diego, and others have done over the last several weeks.

Daniel Van Pelt, a former member of the New Jersey State Legislature, has been given 41 months in a federal prison for accepting at $10,000 bribe to help a developer get the environmental permits needed for construction along the coast of New Jersey. Undercover FBI informants provided the evidence needed to convict Van Pelt.

GhailaniThe White House is currently facing criticism after a federal jury convicted former Guantanamo Bay detainee Ahmed Ghailani of just one out of 285 charges. Critics assert that the single conviction is an example of why suspected terrorists should be tried in military court instead of civilian court. Others, however, cite the conviction as evidence that civilian courts effectively deliver justice.

Many stories in vogue these days involve overzealous politicians caught in egregious attempts to apply the law. On a local scale, one of the latest of these attempts occurred last month in New Castle, New York, when two middle-school students had the police called on them by a town councilman. Their crime? They were selling homemade goods for $1.00 apiece at Gedney Park — cupcakes, cookies, brownies, and Rice Crispy treats which they had baked themselves.

Secretary Janet Napolitano has written an opinion piece defending her cabinet office, the Department of Homeland Security, and its tactics allegedly needed to prevent terrorist attacks on American airline flights. The secretary focused, particularly, on AIT (Advanced Imaging Technology) in use nationwide.