The report from NewsNet5 in Wadsworth, Ohio, was scarcely considered news, rating only a few brief paragraphs: “A gun-carrying couple helped [police] catch a man who was allegedly beating his girlfriend in a parking lot in front of her two children…. Police said the couple, who each have a permit to carry a concealed weapon, called 911 [and] then pulled out their guns and ordered the man to the ground.”

A report by the Justice Department’s Inspector General blasted the Federal Bureau of Investigation for lying and spying on anti-war activists, animal-rights groups, and environmentalists, calling the improper “terror” investigations "unreasonable and inconsistent with FBI policy."

If Anwar al-Awlaki gets his way, the last sound cartoonist Molly Morris will hear is the swish of a scimitar. Or, more likely, a bomb blast.

crimeThe FBI has reported that for the third straight year incidents of violent crime have declined across the United States. According to the federal police agency, violent crime declined by 5.3 percent during 2009, accompanied by a nearly five percent drop in property crimes.

Nine years ago today, 19 hijackers commandeered four civilian jetliners in American airspace and perpetrated the worst act of terrorism in American history. None of us who witnessed those terrible events will ever be able to contemplate or discuss them without the emotions natural to every human being who has ever experienced shock or tragedy. I lost no friends or relatives in the 9/11 attacks, nor has anyone of my acquaintance been killed or injured in the wars that ensued in Afghanistan or Iraq. But I feel now, as I felt on September 12, 2001, a sense of loss for an America that I had known for the first 37 years of my life, an America that quite possibly has been lost forever.