The concerns voiced against the intrusive Transportation Security Administration screening procedures have been confirmed by experts at Child Lures Prevention. According to the organization, in an effort to have children cooperate with the TSA screenings, the TSA is calling the airport pat-downs “a game.” As a result, children who experience the enhanced pat-downs may become desensitized to sexual molestation.

Advocates of the right to keep and bear arms have long maintained that the text of the Second Amendment to the U.S. Constitution (“A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.”) is not that hard to understand: The right to self-defense is among the chief enumerated rights of all American citizens.

Mohamed Osman MohamudOn Friday, November 26, Somali-born Mohamed Osman Mohamud, 19, parked a van loaded with what he thought was a bomb near Pioneer Courthouse Square, Portland, Oregon, where the city’s annual Christmas tree-lighting ceremony was taking place. He dialed a telephone number that he expected would detonate the bomb. Nothing happened. On the advice of an associate, he stepped out of the car to dial again. At that moment, FBI agents arrested him on charges of attempting to use a weapon of mass destruction; if found guilty, he could face life imprisonment.

So far, the great Thanksgiving protest against the TSA has been a turkey. As of midday Wednesday, only a few scattered protesters have been reported at airports nationwide, with very few travelers (at least according to the TSA) opting out of the full body scans, which amount to virtual strip searches of men, women, and children. Though some passengers are grumbling at the new security, few have been willing to stand up for themselves as John Tyner, a software engineer from San Diego, and others have done over the last several weeks.

Daniel Van Pelt, a former member of the New Jersey State Legislature, has been given 41 months in a federal prison for accepting at $10,000 bribe to help a developer get the environmental permits needed for construction along the coast of New Jersey. Undercover FBI informants provided the evidence needed to convict Van Pelt.