Nidal HasanAccused Ft. Hood murderer Major Nidal Hasan was charged Wednesday by military attorneys with 32 counts of attempted murder in connection with the victims wounded in his armed rampage on November 5. Among those injured by Hasan were the two civilian police officers who eventually fired on Hasan and brought him down, ending the massacre.

White House breachCongress is calling for a hearing on the November 24 incident involving a married couple crashing a White House State Dinner being hosted by President Barack Obama for Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh.

Justifiably, much is being made in the press of FBI, Department of Homeland Security, and Pentagon investigators’ inscrutable failure to take any sort of appropriate action that may have prevented Major Nidal Hasan’s shooting spree of November 5 — when he shot 13 people to death and wounded more than 30 others at his duty station of Fort Hood, Texas.

KucinichFor a man who has shown little regard for the immutable and sacred principles of the Constitution during his 13-year legislative career in Congress, Representative Dennis Kucinich (D-Ohio) is inexplicably very anxious to extend constitutional protection to accused noncitizen terrorists. When questioned whether he would read Osama bin Laden his rights as required under the Supreme Court’s Miranda ruling, including the right to remain silent and the right to legal counsel, Representative Kucinich responded that everyone, without exception, should be afforded those basic rights.

HasanIn a gambit he must have known was futile from its inception, John Galligan, attorney for accused Ft. Hood murderer Nidal Hasan, played upon the sympathy of the military magistrate presiding at a pre-trial confinement conference held in Hasan’s hospital room on Saturday.