Tuesday, 09 September 2008

CIA Documents: Kissinger Covered Up PLO Assassination of U.S. Ambassador

Written by  William F. Jasper

Henry Kissinger“Henry Kissinger instructed the CIA to continue diplomatic contacts with Yassir Arafat's PLO representatives before the 1973 Yom Kippur War, even after Arafat ordered the kidnapping and murder of the American ambassador and his deputy in Khartoum, Sudan.” So reported the Israeli newspaper, Haaretz, on September 1, 2008.

According to Haaretz reporter Amir Oren, Kissinger’s communications “were exposed in the papers of former CIA chief Richard Helms that were made available to the public last week.” However, The New American was unable to locate these documents on the CIA’s website. When a CIA public affairs officer returned our call on September 4, he said he also was unable to find the mentioned documents but would continue to search for them and get back to us with a more definitive response.

The Haaretz story did not mention the American ambassador or his assistant by name, but they were Ambassador Cleo Noel and Charge d’Affaires George Moore. Their story was an important feature of The New American’s  April 28, 2008 cover article, “A Bad Investment,” exposing the massive U.S. financial, diplomatic, and military aid to the PLO and other terrorist organizations during several U.S. administrations.

As noted in that article, official State Department documents had already surfaced confirming that Kissinger, then President Nixon’s National Security Adviser, had ordered all information suppressed that would reveal PLO leader Yassir Arafat as the real mastermind of Black September, the organization credited with the deliberate, cold-blooded execution of our diplomats, Noel and Moore. Likewise, Kissinger knew full well that Arafat was also responsible for the sensational Black September terrorist attack the previous year at the Munich Olympics, where 11 Israeli athletes were murdered.

By his actions, Kissinger knowingly helped Arafat publicly maintain his innocence and strike a moderate image, while continuing to run Black September as a deniable asset. As in so many other instances, Kissinger went to extraordinary lengths to cover up evidence that would conflict with his agenda, which seemed to be always to present America’s enemies — communist dictatorships, terrorist organizations and terror-sponsoring states — as allies or potential allies of the United States.

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