For most of the stories covering the recent NATO summit in Chicago, the lede was that the war in Afghanistan will wrap up in 2014. After 11 years spending blood and money to run the Taliban out of office only to then invite them back to the bargaining table, America and NATO will pull out and leave the future in the hands of Afghans — mostly.

While the drawdown of forces from Afghanistan is certainly newsworthy, there was something in the dictum of the record of the summit that seems to have slipped past most media outlets, but in the long run probably merits more attention. Although President Obama stated he intends to “shift the focus” of American military alliances to Asia in an effort to keep China from running roughshod over its less-martially inclined neighbors, he indicated he considers the strengthening of NATO to be high on the list of priorities

President Obama will soon apprise Congress of his plan to supply arms with which to equip Italian drones.

According to a story printed by Reuters, “within two weeks” the Obama administration will proceed with the implementation of its projected sale of American-made drones to Italy. Italy will then join the United Kingdom in deploying the remote control weapons loaded with “laser-guided bombs and Hellfire missiles.”

This Memorial Day, before we further decorate the earth with more graves of more young Americans, let us pause to consider who really "supports the  troops." Is it the architects of our policy of perpetual war? Is it those who are eager to send young Americans to die in other people's quarrels or even for other nations' imperial ambitions, all under the endlessly "entangling alliances" of the United Nations and NATO? Or is it those who do not want to put American soldiers in harm's way except when necessary to defend our own country and liberties?

 

The U.S. government’s so-called “War on Drugs” in Central America is under heavy fire again after a barrage of negative publicity surrounding a controversial and deadly operation in Honduras earlier this month: an attack that terrorized villagers and reportedly killed two pregnant women and two children traveling on a riverboat. Fierce criticism also erupted when it emerged later that state-sponsored gunmen speaking English — presumably Americans, according to witnesses — pointed a gun at a teenager’s head and threatened to shoot if he refused to talk.

Ronald Reagan did not support the Law of the Sea Treaty over concerns that our nation would be surrendering sovereignty to the United Nations and Senator Jim Inhofe of Oklahoma thinks the former President was right. Said Inhofe: "I think it’s a tax, since it costs money. I’ve read the work of the U.S. Interagency Extended Continental Shelf Task Force and the briefs and sources there talking about how to quantify the amount of money we would be losing. This is the first time in history that an international organization — the U.N. in this case — would possess taxing authority over this country.”

 
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