Although the Obama administration has been a bit more forthcoming lately in its admission of its policy of using drones to kill enemies by remote control, there is still an official reluctance to let too much information reach the public.

In the last year or so, the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) and a group of reporters have filed Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) petitions requesting that the federal government provide greater access to operational details of the drone program and the legal arguments forwarded by the Obama administration in justifying not only the use of the drones, but their use in the killing of thousands in Pakistan alone.

On Monday, President Obama approved the loan of nearly $126 million to the communist regime in Vietnam to purchase a satellite from Lockheed Martin. In his memorandum to the Secretary of State to authorizing the loan, President Obama insists that making the loan was “in the national interest of the United States.”

The Obama administration and key allies are advancing an all-out effort to pass the Law of the Sea Treaty, using deceptive and blatantly inaccurate facts and disparaging foes.

On Tuesday Representative Ron Paul (R-Texas) rose to speak in the House of Representatives and promised to thwart any effort by the president to initiate military operations in Syria without a formal congressional declaration of war, as required by the Constitution:

This week I am introducing legislation to prohibit the Administration, absent a declaration of war by Congress, from supporting — directly or indirectly — any military or paramilitary operations in Syria,” the constitutionally consistent congressman declared.

GOP presidential contender Mitt Romney asserts that he would not need to seek congressional approval before launching war on Iran, prompting Senator Rand Paul to issue a scathing response. Senator Paul, who recently gave a controversial endorsement of Romney, made it clear that he would not support Romney's unconstitutional foreign policy.