Foreign Policy

Yet another free trade agreement is in the works, as Congress debates the Republic of Korea-United States Free Trade Agreement (also known as KORUS FTA), which would, upon ratification, eliminate 95 percent of each nation's tariffs on goods within five years. It would also create new protections for multinational financial services and other firms who engage in bilateral commerce between the United States and South Korea. Unlike NAFTA, however, KORUS FTA is facing a front of stiff opposition from the new wave of Tea Party conservatives who warn of the possible risks and liabilities to our national sovereignty, economic prowess, and manufacturing capabilities posed by KORUS FTA.

The Obama administration is intensifying its illegal secret war in Yemen as armed rebellions against the U.S.-government-backed dictatorship of Ali Abdullah Saleh (left) threaten to overthrow the regime. But while the mainstream press has been cheering on the unlawful military campaign, experts warned that it could easily backfire.

Considering that the purpose of the “Global War on Terror” is the establishment of outposts of a vast American Empire, there should be little wonder that the President of the United States has demonstrated a willingness to do whatever necessary to convince the Taliban to play ball and join the roster of pliant American client states.

Michael Scheuer, the former chief of the Central Intelligence Agency’s (CIA's) Osama bin Laden unit, told the U.K. Daily Telegraph in a recent interview he was prevented from capturing or killing the terrorist by his superiors on at least 10 separate occasions.

Nowhere on the planet is common sense a scarcer commodity than in Washington, D.C. The $14 trillion in federal debt — much of it held by foreign, and frequently unfriendly, countries — would seem to be sufficient evidence of that. As if that weren’t bad enough, it now emerges that many of those same creditor nations are also the recipients of U.S. foreign aid.

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