The Founding Fathers formed America as a republic. The interests of government were limited primarily to protecting freedom, and in those relatively few instances in which the “general welfare” was involved, the interests of government might include other duties as well. Post roads, the regulation of weights and measurements, the enactment of laws to protect copyrights and patents, a navy to protect American shores and shipping, the regulation of new territories until they could become states — these were the sorts of general welfare functions that the Constitution allowed the federal government to undertake.

The U.S. Ambassador to Malta, Douglas Kmiec, believes that a new report by the State Department indicates that it is intolerant of religious expression.

In a 41-page report released on April 7, the State Department accuses the Pepperdine University law professor and friend of President Obama of being an outspoken Catholic, rebuking him for spending too much time writing and speaking on subjects such as abortion and religious beliefs. The report concludes that Kmiec spends far more time on his religious writings than on his duties as an Ambassador.

Truth, it has been said, is the first casualty of war. The latest evidence of the veracity of this saying: The United States supposedly stopped attacking Libya on April 4, yet since that time U.S. aircraft have continued to fly over the beleaguered nation and assault its air defenses.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation is interviewing hundreds of Libyans in the United States and is on alert for possible terror attacks perpetrated by the Moammar Gadhafi regime or Libyan rebels with ties to terrorist groups, FBI Director Robert Mueller (photo, left) told Congress last week.

With just eight months left until the last American soldier is presumably to be pulled from Iraq, finally ending the eight-year war in that beleaguered country, the Pentagon is reconsidering its decision.

The Associated Press reports:

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