American troops have occupied Iraq since March 3, 2003. Eight years later, after the declaration of one president that the mission was accomplished and the campaign promise of another to end the war and withdraw American forces, there is no end in sight to the deployment.

Currently, there are just fewer than 50,000 American troops stationed in Iraq. In 2008, a deal was struck with that country to withdraw the entire American military presence by December 31, 2011.

US soldier in IraqThink U.S. troops will be leaving Iraq by the end of the year? Think again. CIA Director Leon Panetta, who has been nominated to succeed Robert Gates as Secretary of Defense, says that the Iraqi government is probably going to request that some U.S. forces remain in the country and that Washington will almost certainly oblige.

U.S. taxpayers are being soaked to the tune of $2 million a day for President Barack Obama’s illegal war in Libya, according to a Defense Department memo obtained by the Financial Times. The document, entitled “United States Contribution to Operation Unified Protector,” says that the government is spending about $60 million a month on the mission and had spent $664 million by mid-May.

Yet another free trade agreement is in the works, as Congress debates the Republic of Korea-United States Free Trade Agreement (also known as KORUS FTA), which would, upon ratification, eliminate 95 percent of each nation's tariffs on goods within five years. It would also create new protections for multinational financial services and other firms who engage in bilateral commerce between the United States and South Korea. Unlike NAFTA, however, KORUS FTA is facing a front of stiff opposition from the new wave of Tea Party conservatives who warn of the possible risks and liabilities to our national sovereignty, economic prowess, and manufacturing capabilities posed by KORUS FTA.

The Obama administration is intensifying its illegal secret war in Yemen as armed rebellions against the U.S.-government-backed dictatorship of Ali Abdullah Saleh (left) threaten to overthrow the regime. But while the mainstream press has been cheering on the unlawful military campaign, experts warned that it could easily backfire.