PetraeusPresident Obama announced June 23 that he had “accepted the resignation” of Afghanistan theater commander Gen. Stanley McChrystal and will replace him with Gen. David Petraeus, who commanded the Bush-era “surge” in Iraq. The resignation was forced, essentially Washington-speak for “firing,” and a direct result of an interview McChrystal and his staff gave to Rolling Stone magazine. In that interview, McCrystal criticized President Obama as “unprepared” for their first meeting, said that U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan Karl Eikenberry had “betrayed” him, and generally ridiculed Vice President Joe Biden.

U.S. Military useDo you ever wonder why we are still in Iraq after defeating Saddam Hussein’s forces in March, 2003? Are we peacekeeping until the Iraqis can establish “stability” and “democracy?” Will that ever come? Why are we in Afghanistan? Proving we can outlast the English and the Russians in an endless battle with Afghani tribesmen?

Voice of America and other news sources reported on June 22 that General Stanley McChrystal, the top military commander of U.S., International Security Assistance Force (ISAF), and NATO troops in Afghanistan, has been summoned to Washington to explain critical comments he and members of his staff have made about President Barack Obama and other members of the administration.

One of the most dramatic moments in the 2008 election cycle occurred almost a year and a half before Election Day, during a South Carolina debate among GOP presidential contenders. Ron Paul suggested that U.S. foreign policy was a “major contributing factor” to the terrorists’ motivation to attack us on 9/11. “Have you ever read the reasons they attacked us?” he asked. “They attacked us because we’ve been over there; we’ve been bombing Iraq for ten years.”

Lindsey GrahamA bill introduced in Congress on June 17 by four Senators would prohibit purchases by the U.S. federal government of Chinese goods and services until China agrees to the Agreement on Government Procurement. The bill, formally designated as S. 3505, the China Fair Trade Act of 2010, was introduced by three Democrats, Debbie Stabinow of Michigan, Russ Feingold of Wisconsin, and Sherrod Brown of Ohio, and one Republican, Lindsey Graham of South Carolina.

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